Reclaimed Land (for Bute) #NationalPoetryDay


The pinnacle…
Follow the lights and you will find the gold.
A Severn wind rattles the soul,
Rain like pins my face a cushion.
Edifice a vision, wooden windows a fact,
a collection of faces glued in community,
Now divided again by scheme-funded foolery.
To escape is to renounce
Only with strength comes intrinsically.
As thrust upon pages turn,
A dying side street lives
on the ensign of principality!

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Manau Coll | Lost Spaces


I was asked to respond to some of the history of Tedder House in Llandudno for Ideas People Places, working alongside Marc Rees, Lisa Carter and Helfa Gelf. Now standing empty stripped back to the bare bricks, all the that remains of the old R.A.F.A Club are stories and a few artefacts amongst the surviving members. After meeting with several people who were involved with the old club I was able to piece together a few memories and bring some of this once great town instution back to life. The work was projected onto a trophy cabinet from the old club on the opening night, and club members were invited to see it, there will be another opportunity to see the film in September during Helfa Gelf.

Alan Whitfield, Risk, Sale Arts Centre 2013


Roads030

Roads053

http://watersideartscentre.co.uk/whats-on/1297-risk/

Please go and see my exhibition if you are over at Sale in Manchester

I grew up in an industrial northern town. In the 1980s the industry left…

British industry underwent a period of turbulent change during the 1980s

as a result of new government policies.  The Thatcher administration then

advanced the concept of ‘The Industrial Estate’, which became an out

of town regeneration scheme that every town wanted.

As an island, there is only so much small industry our infrastructure can support.

Often when an area receives European funding, it is designated as an

inhabitable Brownfield Site renovation scheme. Such official terminology

can be perceived as disingenuous and becomes a metaphor for deprivation.

I aim to document the junctions and roads of the areas where the jobs never came.


	

Loving Diane Arbus


Reproduction of Diane Arbus' "A young man...
Reproduction of Diane Arbus’ “A young man with curlers at home on west 20th street”picture, shot on 35 mm film developped the old fashion way (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Diane Arbus' contact sheet from the photo shoot
Diane Arbus’ contact sheet from the photo shoot (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

So today was the day…
I got my hands on the book I’ve dreamt about for a long time. No more will I have to look it images on-line. I got hold of the legend that is An Aperture Monograph by Diane Arbus, my first lady of photography. The minute I bought the book I thought I want to write about it. I want to understand it. So I started reading through the Severn or so pages put together from various Arbus interviews before her untimely death.

 

 

The front cover of the two twins is the story of the next 50 or so images. Life is the same thing but everything is different. We judge on the discrepancy rather than happiness. They transpose sadness into our own grief and our lack of understanding of the situation we structure around our opinions.

 

I don’t think you can say the book is to show anything specific as it was never put together by the artist. However you get a feel of image impact, isolation, turmoil and confrontation. Arbus captures eyes so well they haunt in every image. The much talked about boy in the park image taken in central park in 1970

 

 

Is one of my favourite images of all time. What i love more is this image captures the essence of the decisive moment invented by Henri Cartier-Bresson and the fine line of Stadium and Punctum devised by Roland Barthes

 

what he terms, the stadium and the punctum. The Studium refers to the range of meanings available and obvious to everyone; it is unary and coded, the former term implying that the image is a unified and self-contained whole whose meaning can be taken in at a glance (without effort, or ‘thinking’)

 

The Punctum is a detail or “partial object” that attracts and holds the viewer’s (the Spectator’s) gaze; it pricks or wounds the observer.

 

(Exerts from Roland Barthes Camera Lucida)

 

We see the stadium in the image of the alleged psychopath child, the posed image. The image without information has a second world war germanic feel to it again you are caught by the eyes. What really pull’s you in creating the Punctum of image is the grenade which sends a cold shudder down your spine.

 

This is also the decisive moment as described by Bresson

 

“To me, photography is the simultaneous recognition, in a fraction of a second, of the significance of an event as well as of a precise organization of forms which give that event its proper expression”.

 

Henry Cartier-Bresson

 

This is shown by the selection of contact images from the central park image

 

 

Depicting the sweet child at play. I’m not sure what Arbus said to her subjects but her befriending of subjects resulting in lasting looks. I think in a time when it may have been frowned upon to capture transvestite, dwarfs and people with disability. Arbus skill to control the image and get the subject to pull the face we least expect. The down syndrome children laughing and joking. The cross dressing entertainer looking sad and troubled something people would never have seen and been challenged by.

 

The images that have had the most influence on my work are the empty spaces. loveless and striking

 

The Swan lake image I see as Arbus on her travels to new unvisited places that she would venture to photographing the people who inhabit them.

 

Maybe I see Arbus in the wrong way to me she is strength and reason to take on and photograph the mundane.

 

What do you think?

 

 

Will it Change your View


Adding Photography to music is something that really interests me. I was approached by Joel Cockrill to work on a project with my images to his music. I think the music changes the feel of work. What do you think? The work is from three bodies of work. The now demolished car park from Get Carter in Gateshead called Trinity Square. It was designed by Owen Lunder. One of the top designers in the Brutalist movement. My Surrealist Seamless links work and the more recent ‘your last breath’

Using John Szarkowski Photographers Eye Theory




I recently read John Szarokowski’s 1964 book The Photographers Eye. This was produced to cover M.O.M.A first critically acclaimed photography exhibition, in the book he cover the topics which he sees are the 5 basic principles of a photograph. They are

THE THING ITSELF

This is my Cat Millie she runs the house. The look on her face makes me think of Robert De Niro In Taxi Driver http://www.filmsite.org/wavfiles/taxidriver2.wav

THE DETAIL

As you can see from the information the image gives you . She is a cute cat with fine gray fur and eyes that could melt ice burghs. She is always alert never switching off. She can be very placid when she can be bothered with human interaction. The closeness of the image gives the scale human qualities as often used by the likes of William Eggleston

THE FRAME

The framing of the image shows that she is in a house lording it up on a chair. The slightly off centre subject in the image gives you a feel of warmth and content maybe sat in front room

TIME

I had to be quick and get the cat looking straight into the lens of the camera, had she have been looking away it would have lost some power and honesty it was taken at 1/8 f8 iso 100 flash +2 zoom 50mm

VANTAGE POINT

The subject is the key to the image . We are not interested in anything else the image has to offer other than maybe its indoors. Taken from higher vantage point i.e standing; the cat would have looked different. A shot from the side would be distracted by a clock case or the T.v. So on my knees close in at the cats view of things makes us engage with the subject.

These are simple thing you can do every time you take a photo. a simple image can when broken down tell so much. What do you think?

 

Your Last Breath #5


Alone, you call. ANYONE!!!

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